Kefir vs Yogurt

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kefir vs yogurt

Yogurt and milk kefir are both cultured dairy products. This isn’t the case at all. Yogurt and milk kefir differ in various ways. It includes the bacteria they contain, and their flavor and consistency.

Kefir vs Yogurt

Milk kefir can be grown with a reusable or single-use culture, just like yogurt. While a small portion of the previous batch of yoghurt. The “grains” are actually a gelatinous material containing a wide range of bacteria. 

Kefir in powder form starter, similar to a direct-set yoghurt culture, can  make milk kefir. Powdered kefir starter culture can be re-cultured a few times using kefir from a previous batch, but a new powdered starter will eventually be needed.

Yoghurt

Reusable and single-use yoghurt starters are available. Once activated, reusable yoghurt starters are re-cultured by combining a portion of a previous yoghurt batch with fresh milk. When a fresh batch is finished, it serves as the starter for the following batch, and so on. At least once a week, these yoghurt cultures should be re-culturing.

 

BACTERIA TYPES FOUND IN KEFIR VS. YOGURT

Kefir Bacteria

Milk kefir bacteria have the ability to colonise the intestines. Kefir, in addition to yeasts, contains a far bigger variety of bacteria. This article summarizes the findings of two researchers on the bacteria and yeast strains found in milk kefir grains.

Yogurt

It contains beneficial bacteria that help keep the digestive tract clean and offer food for the good bacteria that live in a healthy gut. Transient bacteria are bacteria that travel through the digestive tract.

KEFIR VERSUS YOGURT IN TERMS OF FLAVOR AND CONSISTENCY

 

Kefir made from milk

Milk Kefir is also tart, but because of the helpful yeasts present in the culture. It can have a hint of yeast. The flavor of milk kefir is sounder than that of yogurt, and it’s been described as a cross between cultured buttermilk and yogurt. Flavor can also be manipulated by adjusting the fermenting time. Milk kefir is typically taken as a cultured dairy drink, rather than yogurt, which is virtually generally eaten with a spoon.

Yogurt

It comes in a variety of thicknesses, ranging from a thin, pourable yogurt-like Prima. Creamy yogurt-like Bulgarian. However, most yogurt variants are thicker than kefir.

In our post on choosing a yogurt starter, you may evaluate the flavor and consistency made by each of our yogurt starters.